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L’HABITACIÓ DEL COSTAT (THE VIBRATOR PLAY) de Sarah Ruhl (Sarah Ruhl’s In the other room. The vibrator play)

The second half of the 19th century, on the outskirts of New York, during the so-called “Victorian era”.
A doctor fascinated by scientific and technological progress, Dr. Givings, experiments with the use of an unusual electrical device that would have to serve to cure all kinds of dysfunctions and neuroses of a sexual nature: a vibrator (in its most primitive version).
Meanwhile, his young and vital wife, Mrs. Givings, is experiencing serious difficulties in properly breastfeeding and feeding both their babies, which has her very worried. And, at the same time, she experiences a growing curiosity about the extravagant therapies that her husband, with the utmost secrecy, practices in the next room…

CREATIVE TEAM

Translation: Joan Sellent
Directed by: Julio Manrique
With:  Ivan Benet, Carlota Olcina, Pol López, Mireia Aixalà, Xavi Ricart, Alba Florejachs i Adeline Flaun
Stage, props and costumes designer: Alejandro Andújar
Lightning designer: Jaume Ventura
Sound designer: Damien Bazin
Musical composer: Carles Pedragosa
Costumes made by: Maribel Rodríguez
Stage builders: Pascualín Estructures i Pro-escènic (Pilar Albadalejo)
Produced by: La Brutal i La Villarroel

DIRECTOR’S NOTES

Sarah Rhul is an American author with a unique, strangely pure look. A look sensitive to mystery, tenderness, humour and magic.
Her characters contemplate, fascinated and stunned, with the eyes of a child who knows nothing and learns everything, like a light bulb. They do it like someone attending a miracle: the miracle of light.
We are in Victorian America, around 1880. The America that followed the violent civil war that pitted an abolitionist north against a still-slavery south.
We are at the beginning of the era of electricity, the beginning of the modern era.
Before, long before, the world was digitized and pornography invaded us.
Here and there, the most extravagant inventions proliferate, extraordinary apparatuses that will have to revolutionize the ancient world. A new and unstoppable religion is inaugurated: that of progress.
We are at the home of Dr. Givings, a fervent devotee of the new belief, and his young and adorable wife, Mrs. Givings.
They live together, perhaps even esteem each other. But they don’t know each other. We are in Victorian times.
As she wanders, restlessly, through the living room, with a hungry baby in her arms and her head beyond the clouds, her husband rehearses a revolutionary method of healing. An unusual treatment for patients who present symptoms of what Freud (always so “Freudian”) agreed to call hysteria. An object that, conveniently plugged into the current, will work the miracle of satisfaction, of healing, of happiness.
In the living room, the baby cries. And, with him, his mother. Both cry, so full of life, without knowing what to do.
Then they feel a noise. And a drowned out cry. And then a long silence.
The mother is silent and thinks. And, with her, her little one.
Something is happening, is happening, in the next room